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PL/SQL Challenge

Functions: Deterministic Functions

The DETERMINISTIC keyword is useful for self-documentation of code (you are expressing an intention, that this function should have no side-effects). But the PL/SQL compiler does not check to see if the function truly is deterministic.

Author: Steven Feuerstein [10781-1062424]
2015-04-17 FridayNo Comments
Last: No Comments
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PL/SQL Explore

DBMS_SQL: DBMS_SQL.TO_CURSOR_NUMBER Function

When you use DBMS_SQL.to_cursor_number to convert a cursor variable to a DBMS_SQL cursor handle, you do not need to close the cursor variable. If you try, Oracle will raise an error. 

Author: Steven Feuerstein [10806-1066703]
2015-04-17 FridayNo Comments
Last: No Comments
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PL/SQL Deja Vu

Pad and Trim Strings: TRIM

Use TRIM as an alternative to LTRIM and RTRIM; it allows you to specify trimming from left or right. You can use TRIM with CLOBs as well as VARCHAR2.

Author: Steven Feuerstein [6306-1062425]
2015-04-17 FridayNo Comments
Last: No Comments
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PL/SQL Deja Vu

Character Functions Returning Number Values: INSTR

When you need to find out information about if and where a character (or, more generally, any string) occurs within a larger string, INSTR offers the most flexibility.

Author: Steven Feuerstein [5800-1053162]
2015-04-10 FridayNo New Comments

Last: 2015-04-14 14:18:16
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PL/SQL Explore

FORALL: Sparse Bind Arrays in FORALL

When using the FORALL iterator IN low .. high format, your collection must be densely filled between the low and high values. The collection does not, however, have to start on index value 1.

Author: Steven Feuerstein [10744-1053160]
2015-04-10 FridayNo Comments
Last: No Comments
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PL/SQL Challenge

How PL/SQL Resolves Identifier Names: Resolution of Names in Static SQL Statements

When referencing collection elements in static DML, use as simple expression as possible in order to avoid unexpected errors. For example, you cannot use local functions or collection methods of a non-SQL collection as part of an expression that evaluates to the index of collection element.

Author: Elic (37634) [10662-1053091]
2015-04-10 FridayNo New Comments

Last: 2015-04-15 11:40:40
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PL/SQL Challenge

Working with collection variables: The TABLE Operator

Use the TABLE operator when you need to merge data in tables with session-only data in collections. Or when you need to manipulate a collection with SQL set operations.

Author: Steven Feuerstein [10741-1049095]
2015-04-03 FridayNo New Comments

Last: 2015-04-08 12:13:35
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PL/SQL Deja Vu

Data Manipulation Language (DML) Statements: RETURNING Column Values from DML Statements

Add a RETURNING INTO clause to an insert, update or delete statement to obtain the value of one or more columns modified by that DML statement. If the statement modifies more than one row, make use you use RETURNING BULK COLLECT INTO.


Author: Steven Feuerstein [1961-1049096]
2015-04-03 FridayNo Comments
Last: No Comments
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PL/SQL Explore

Numeric Data Types : PLS_INTEGER, BINARY_INTEGER and Related Subtypes

Both INTEGER and NUMBER support up to 38 significant digits, while the maximum value allowed for BINARY_INTEGER and all of its subtypes, including PLS_INTEGER, 2**32 - 1.

Author: Steven Feuerstein [10742-1049098]
2015-04-03 FridayNo Comments
Last: No Comments
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PL/SQL Deja Vu

Scalar Data Types : Boolean Data Types

If you are working entirely within PL/SQL, there is no need to use VARCHAR2 (Y/N) or INTEGER (1/0) to represent Boolean values. Instead, use the BOOLEAN datatype and TRUE/FALSE values.

Author: Steven Feuerstein [9525-1041992]
2015-03-27 FridayNo Comments
Last: No Comments
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PL/SQL Challenge

Caching Options for PL/SQL-Based Applications: Function Result Cache

If a result-cached function executes non-query DML (insert, update, delete) against a table, the table changed by that DML is not recorded as a "relies on" dependency for the cached data. In other words, result cache dependencies are only triggered by queries against tables and views.

Author: Steven Feuerstein [10701-1038194]
2015-03-27 FridayNo Comments
Last: No Comments
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PL/SQL Explore

Handling Exceptions: WHEN OTHERS

Using WHEN OTHERS instead of more specific clauses, like WHEN VALUE_ERROR, can lead to confusion and difficulty in diagnosing the source of a problem.

Author: Steven Feuerstein [10721-1041989]
2015-03-27 FridayNo New Comments

Last: 2015-03-30 13:56:20
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PL/SQL Challenge

The FOR LOOP Statement: Cursor FOR Loops

Use a cursor FOR loop to fetch all rows from a cursor (unless the loop body contains DML, in which case consider using BULK COLLECT and FORALL). The cursor can be defined locally or in a package. Write your own explicit loop and you are more likely to introduce bugs.

Author: Steven Feuerstein [10681-1029166]
2015-03-20 FridayNo Comments
Last: No Comments
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PL/SQL Explore

Instantiation and Initialization: Behavior When Package Initialization Fails

The package specification raises a VALUE_ERROR exception, so the initialization section never fires to set the value to 100. 

Author: Steven Feuerstein [10689-1031662]
2015-03-20 FridayNo Comments
Last: No Comments
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PL/SQL Deja Vu

Nested Tables: Checking for Empty Nested Table

To check to see if a nested table is empty, you can call the COUNT method, use the IS EMPTY operator or call the CARDINALITY function.

Author: Steven Feuerstein [6059-1022693]
2015-03-20 FridayNo New Comments

Last: 2012-09-14 20:01:15
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